If you can build a site with WordPress.com, you should build your site on WordPress.com.

From CSS-Tricks: https://css-tricks.com/if-you-can-build-a-site-with-wordpress-com-you-should-build-your-site-on-wordpress-com/ That’s what I like to tell people. I’ve seen too many websites die off, often damaging the company along the way because the technical debt of hosting and maintaining the website is too much in the long term. For a few examples, there is the domain name itself to handle and the … Continue reading If you can build a site with WordPress.com, you should build your site on WordPress.com.

A11Y with Lindsey

From CSS-Tricks: https://css-tricks.com/a11y-with-lindsey/ Lindsey Kopacz has a wonderful blog about accessibility. I've seen a number of her articles making the rounds lately and I was like, dang I better make sure I'm subscribed. For example: An Introduction to ARIA States3 Simple Tips to Improve Keyboard AccessibilityCreate custom keyboard accessible checkboxes Regarding that last one, I … Continue reading A11Y with Lindsey

How to Use the Web Share API

From CSS-Tricks: https://css-tricks.com/how-to-use-the-web-share-api/ The Web Share API is one that has seemingly gone under the radar since it was first introduced in Chrome 61 for Android. In essence, it provides a way to trigger the native share dialog of a device (or desktop, if using Safari) when sharing content — say a link or a … Continue reading How to Use the Web Share API

Using DevTools to Improve the UX Design to Development Process

From CSS-Tricks: https://css-tricks.com/using-devtools-to-improve-the-ux-design-to-development-process/ I’d like to tell you how I see code and design intersect and support one another. Specifically, I want to cover how designers can use code in their everyday work. I suggest this not because it’s a required skill, but because even a baseline understanding of coding can make designs better and … Continue reading Using DevTools to Improve the UX Design to Development Process

Color contrast accessibility tools

From CSS-Tricks: https://css-tricks.com/color-contrast-accessibility-tools/ Accessibility is all the rage these days, specifically when it comes to color contrast. I’ve stumbled upon a couple of tools this week that I think are pretty nifty for helping make sure that all of the text on our websites is legible regardless of what background color they might have. First … Continue reading Color contrast accessibility tools

The difference between keyboard and screen reader navigation

From CSS-Tricks: https://tink.uk/the-difference-between-keyboard-and-screen-reader-navigation/ There are a few differences between keyboards and screen readers and Léonie Watson highlights of them: When using the tab key, keyboard focus and screen reader focus are synchronised with each other. The rest of the time, screen reader users have an enormous range of commands at their disposal for reading and … Continue reading The difference between keyboard and screen reader navigation

The Many Ways of Getting Data Into Charts

From CSS-Tricks: https://css-tricks.com/the-many-ways-of-getting-data-into-charts/ Data is available everywhere nowadays, whether it’s in a plain text file, a REST API, an online Google sheet… you name it! It’s that variety of context that makes building graphs more than simply having a database in your local project — where there is data, there is a way. That’s pretty … Continue reading The Many Ways of Getting Data Into Charts

Naming things to improve accessibility

From CSS-Tricks: https://hiddedevries.nl/en/blog/2019-04-18-naming-things-to-improve-accessibility?utm_source=CSS-Weekly&utm_campaign=Issue-360&utm_medium=email I like the this wrap-up statement from Hidde de Vries: In modern browsers, our markup becomes an accessibility tree that ultimately informs what our interface looks like to assistive technologies. It doesn’t matter as much whether you’ve written this markup: in a .html file in Twig, Handlebars or Nunjucks as the <template> … Continue reading Naming things to improve accessibility

Why, How, and When to Use Semantic HTML and ARIA

From CSS-Tricks: https://css-tricks.com/why-how-and-when-to-use-semantic-html-and-aria/ Semantic HTML and Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) help create interfaces that work for everyone in the most performant, robust, and simple way possible. They add essential meaning to your content, which lets web browsers, search engines, screen readers, RSS readers, and ultimately users understand it. And yet, many people still don’t … Continue reading Why, How, and When to Use Semantic HTML and ARIA